The Quantum Thomist

Musings about quantum physics, classical philosophy, and the connection between the two.
More recent articles

A Universe from Nothing? Part 7: Concluding thoughts

Last modified on Tue Apr 7 21:01:33 2020


I offer my concluding thoughts on Lawrance Krauss' work A Universe From Nothing, focussing on his preface and epilogue.

Probability, Fields and Bell's Theorem

Last modified on Sun Mar 22 22:57:34 2020


I reply to certain recent comments on various posts on my blog.

Classical theism podcast.

Last modified on Sat Dec 21 22:25:09 2019


If you haven't yet done so please check out the classical theism podcast.

A Universe from Nothing? Part 6: Where do the laws come from?

Last modified on Wed Dec 11 22:37:17 2019


I review chapter 11 of Krauss' Universe From Nothing. In this chapter, he argues that the laws of physics themselves might spring forth from a combination of the multiverse and randomness. But where do the laws governing the multiverse come from?.

Are left-wing and right-wing politics a false dichotomy?

Last modified on Sun Nov 17 20:33:04 2019


In politics, we are constantly told that there is a left, a right, and a centre. But is that a reasonable metaphor to use? Are the various political positions points along the same line, or do they belong on entirely different lines altogether?

A Universe from Nothing? Part 5: Is Nothing Unstable?

Last modified on Sat Oct 19 19:21:11 2019


In this fifth part of a series discussing Professor Lawrence Krauss' work A Universe From Nothing, I have a look at his tenth chapter, where he attempts to show that nothing is unstable.

A Universe from Nothing? Part 4: Is Nothing Something?

Last modified on Wed Sep 11 16:50:31 2019


In this fourth part of a series discussing Professor Lawrence Krauss' work A Universe From Nothing, I have a look at his ninth chapter, where he begins his philosophical discussion. In particular, he attempts to show how the universe could have started from a small patch of empty space. Along the way, he tries to justify his definition of nothing as empty space.

The A and B Theories of Time

Last modified on Sun Jul 21 16:56:30 2019


One big debate among philosophers is on the nature of time. The A theory of time states that the division between past, present and future is an objective feature of the universe. The B theory of time views space time as a four dimensional block, and denies that there is a time that we can objectively point to as the present; rather all notions of the present time are either an illusion or merely subjective.

The A theory is the older approach, and was adopted by most people before the twentieth century. It is argued that it is supported by our common experience. The B theory approach found favour after the theory of relativity was introduced, with its support for the four dimensional universe.

In this post I firstly give my own thoughts on the topic, and secondly review the discussion by Edward Feser in his book Aristotle's revenge.

A Universe from Nothing? Part 3: Fine Tuning

Last modified on Sun Jun 16 00:23:25 2019


In this third part of a series discussing Professor Lawrence Krauss' work A Universe From Nothing, I have a look at his eigth chapter, where he discusses the small value of the cosmological constant, fine tuning, and the multiverse.

A Universe from Nothing? Part 2: Particle Physics

Last modified on Sat Jul 13 18:37:57 2019


In this second part of a series discussing Professor Lawrence Krauss' work A Universe From Nothing, I have a look at his fourth chapter, where he takes a break from cosmology and ventures into particle physics. Krauss claims that particles can and do emerge from the vacuum. Is he right? And is the vacuum Nothing?

Earlier articles